What Does Your Skin Look Like After Radiation?

Does radiation weaken your immune system?

Certain cancer treatments (such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, stem cell or bone marrow transplant, or steroids) or the cancer itself can suppress or weaken the immune system.

These treatments can lower the number of white blood cells (WBCs) and other immune system cells..

What does skin look like after radiation therapy?

Skin problems. Your skin in the radiation treatment area might look red, irritated, swollen, blistered, sunburned, or tanned. After a few weeks, your skin might become dry, flaky, or itchy, or it may peel. This is sometimes called radiation dermatitis.

Does discoloration from radiation go away?

Skin discoloration will most likely fade one or two months after you finish radiation. Radiation therapy after breast surgery may cause other long-term changes in the breast. Your skin may be slightly darker, and pores may be enlarged and more noticeable.

How long does radiation burn last?

While these wounds may look and feel like burns, the term is a misnomer, since the treatment does not actually burn the skin. For it to heal, the skin needs time to regenerate, a process that may take two to four weeks for mild reactions, or several months or more for serious injuries.

What is the most common acute side effect of radiation treatment?

Fatigue is the most common acute side effect of radiation therapy. It is believed to be caused by the tremendous amount of energy that is used by the body to heal itself in response to radiation therapy. Most people begin to feel fatigued about 2 weeks after radiation treatments begin.

What can you put on your skin after radiation?

Manage irritation during and after your course of radiation At the beginning of treatment, before you have any side effects, moisturize the skin after your daily treatment with an ointment such as A&D, Eucerin, Aquaphor, Biafene, or Radiacare.

How long does it take for skin to heal from radiation?

Most skin reactions happen within the first 2 weeks of starting radiation therapy. They usually go away a few weeks after treatment, but some skin changes, like skin darkening or scarring, can be permanent.

How do you rid your body of radiation?

Decontamination involves removing external radioactive particles. Removing clothing and shoes eliminates about 90 percent of external contamination. Gently washing with water and soap removes additional radiation particles from the skin. Decontamination prevents radioactive materials from spreading more.

How can I protect my body from radiation?

Staying inside will reduce your exposure to radiation.Close windows and doors.Take a shower or wipe exposed parts of your body with a damp cloth.Drink bottled water and eat food in sealed containers.

How long does it take for fatigue to go away after radiation?

Radiation can give you fatigue that tends to get worse over time. It usually lasts 3 to 4 weeks after your treatment stops, but it can continue for up to 3 months.

Will my skin go back to normal after radiation?

Your skin should start to feel better a few weeks after radiation therapy ends. Be warned, though: When your skin heals, it may be a darker color. What’s more, you’ll still need to protect yourself from the sun — even after radiation therapy has ended.

Does radiation shorten your life?

chemotherapy, radiation therapy and other cancer treatments cause aging at a genetic and cellular level, prompting DNA to start unraveling and cells to die off sooner than normal. bone marrow transplant recipients are eight times more likely to become frail than their healthy siblings.

What is the first sign of too much radiation?

The initial signs and symptoms of treatable radiation sickness are usually nausea and vomiting. The amount of time between exposure and when these symptoms develop is a clue to how much radiation a person has absorbed.

Is radiation worse than chemo?

When it comes to side effects, radiation therapy is a little different than chemotherapy in that it only causes side effects in the area being treated (with the exception of fatigue), and generally has risk for both early and late side effects.