Question: How Do I Follow Up Without Micromanaging?

How do you survive a micromanager?

5 Ways to Survive a Micromanaging BossBe your own control freak.

Focus on what’s within your sphere of control.

Focus on outcome.

When taking on new assignments, ask, “What will success look like?” If you are clear on the outcome, then how you accomplish it can be up to you.Be proactive.

Micromanagers don’t like surprises.

Goals and roles.

Get specific..

How do you follow up without being annoying?

7 Tactics of Following Up Without Being AnnoyingBeing persistent doesn’t mean daily. Doing follow-up every day doesn’t indicate your gumption or passion; give respect to a person’s time. … Select a communication medium. … Try multiple channels. … Don’t act like you’re owed anything. … Your objective is an answer. … Have a plan. … Say thank you.

How can I supervise without micromanaging?

How to manage without micromanagingMicromanagement vs. accountability. … Why micromanaging should be avoided. When employees feel like they’re under a microscope, it can be distracting. … Managing an accountable team. … Be open about accountability. … Provide your employees with what they need. … Work with your team.

How do I stop micromanaging my employees?

How to Stop Micromanaging Your EmployeesPractice Delegating. If you don’t know how to delegate effectively, you might unintentionally end up micromanaging your team. … Set Clear Expectations. … Let Go of Perfectionism. … Hire the Right People. … Ask Your Employees How They Prefer to Be Managed.

How do you follow up with a team member?

Do one-on-one recapitulations of what has been done with each of your team members. Analyze their work together and keep them focused on the results. Always give feedback, and set the priorities together. This will help them pursue their goals swimmingly and with an appropriate amount of autonomy.

Why is micromanaging bad?

Micromanagement can be tempting, especially for new leaders. The less control employees have, the lower the chances for unwanted surprises. But in reality, micromanaging is bad for employees and bad for company productivity. Remember that before getting overly involved with how employees work.

Why do bosses micromanage?

Bosses usually micromanage for one of two reasons—either it’s their natural inclination and they treat all of their reports this way, or they only treat a certain employee this way because they don’t trust that person.

What is a micromanager personality?

The term micromanagement generally refers to someone who manages a project, team or staff member using techniques that involve overly close supervision, and a lack of desire or ability to delegate tasks– especially decision-making authority. … From an “outside” perspective a micromanager may appear successful.

How do you fix micromanagement?

In general, micromanagers:Resist delegating.Immerse themselves in overseeing the projects of others.Start by correcting tiny details instead of looking at the big picture.Take back delegated work before it is finished if they find a mistake in it.Discourage others from making decisions without consulting them.

How can I improve my follow up skills?

Your Coaching Is Only as Good as Your Follow-Up SkillsRight after the meeting:Write things down. You won’t remember everything you see, hear, and think about your employees’ progress, so write it down in a dedicated place. … Ongoing:Follow up on agreements. … Observe signs of growth. … Check in directly. … Communicate impact. … Watch for changes in the relationship.More items…•

How do you tell someone not to micromanage?

Stop Being MicromanagedWhat the Experts Say. Micromanagers abound in today’s organizations but typically, it has nothing to do with performance. … Evaluate the behavior. … Don’t fight it. … Increase trust. … Make upfront agreements. … Keep your boss in the loop. … Give feedback, only if appropriate. … Principles to Remember.More items…•

What are the signs of a micromanager?

Common signs your boss is micromanaging:They avoid delegation.You’re constantly making reports.You’re not allowed to make decisions.They complain constantly.They won’t pass on their skills or knowledge.They don’t see the forest for the trees.Feedback falls on deaf ears.Projects drag on forever.

What micromanaging does to employees?

Micromanagement is a complete waste of everybody’s time. It sucks the life out of employees, fosters anxiety and creates a high stress work environment. A manager’s job is to provide guidance and support. It’s facilitating a healthy environment where employees can perform at their best.

Is micromanaging a form of harassment?

“Hands-on” management becomes micromanagement, the “New York Times” says, when it’s so intensive it interferes with productivity and performance. If you or one of your staff manage employee behavior that closely, it may not be good for morale, but it’s not usually counted as harassment.

How do you follow up a project?

4 steps to follow to succeed in your projectrun a preliminary study to plan the project.try to anticipate possible contingencies by listing risk management criteria.demonstrate leadership and manage your team by taking inspiration from collaborative working methods such as the agile or Scrum methods.More items…•