How Do You Use Had Had?

When to use has or have or had?

HAVE and HAS.

HAVE and HAS are both used in the present tense.

They only differ when used in person (point-of-view) and in number.

HAVE is used for the singular first-person point-of-view..

What is the sentence of had had had?

The sentence is easier to understand with added punctuation and emphasis: James, while John had had “had”, had had “had had”; “had had” had had a better effect on the teacher. In each of the five “had had” word pairs in the above sentence, the first of the pair is in the past perfect form.

Do you have or had?

In the present tense, “have” is used for I, you, we, and they and all plural nouns. “Has” is used for he, she, and it, and for all singular nouns. (“Has” is the third person singular form of “have.”) In the past tense, “had” is used for everything.

Did we have or had?

Yes we can use both of them in a sentence. As you know had is the past participle form and did is the simple past. So normally had is used in past perfect or continious.

Have been or had been?

“Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

What is difference between have and had?

The “have” is a present-tense state-of-being verb. The “seen” is a verb without any tense but with the perfect aspect. … In 3), the “had” is a past-tense state-of-being verb.

What did you have or had?

1 Answer. “Had” is not the appropriate tense to use in this case: you must use “have”. The grammatically correct form of your sentence would be “Did you already have the opportunity to do something?” Otherwise, your sentence is just fine.

What are examples of had?

Past Perfect Tense ExamplesHad met: She had met him before the party.Had left: The plane had left by the time I got to the airport.Had written: I had written the email before he apologized.Had wanted: Kate had wanted to see the movie, but she did not have money for the ticket.

What is had in grammar?

The past perfect is used when two events happened in the past, with one past action having occurred even before the other past action. … To form the past perfect, use had and the past participle of a verb in one part of the sentence.

Is it correct to say had had?

It is correct, though it too might seem a bit awkward. To understand “had had,” we need to take a look at the present perfect and past perfect tenses. … Present perfect tense uses “has” and “have” plus the past participle, as in “have had” and “has gone.” Now let’s put the chocolate sentence in the past tense.

Where we use have had?

Had had is the past perfect form of have when it is used as a main verb to describe our experiences and actions. We use the past perfect when we are talking about the past and want to refer back to an earlier past time, Madiini.

What is the grammar rule for had?

‘Had’ is the past tense of both ‘has’ and ‘have’.have. Have is used with some pronouns and plural nouns: … has. Has is used with the third person singular. … contractions. I have = I’ve. … negative contractions. … ‘have’ and ‘has’ in questions. … ‘have got’ and ‘have’ … ‘have’ and ‘has’ verb tenses. … modal verbs: ‘have to’More items…•

How do you use have had?

Both “have” and “has” are used with “had” to link some (recent) past to the present (refer to 1 and 3). They are also used to denote to something which occurs periodically (refer to 2). While “had had” is used to link some past experience to the present.

What is the meaning of have had?

“Have had” is using the verb have in the present perfect tense. … On the other hand, we use the present perfect tense to describe an event from the past that has some connection to the present. Compare the following two sentences: I had a lot of homework this week.

What is the meaning of I have had enough?

Want no more of something, as in I’ve had enough of their quarreling. This phrase uses enough in the sense of “an adequate amount,” which is intended ironically to mean “a more than sufficient amount.” [c. 1700] For synonyms, see fed to the gills; have had it, def.